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The Genial Hearth
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Archive for June, 2008

This Week

Our plans for
Week 5, Block 5, Dorothea Term (Break Week)

This week marks the middle of our planned year. So we don’t even have a folksong on the plan. But given how slack we’ve been in the last block about poetry (and given that the poem that we missed out on as a result was one of my favourites!) I am planning on reading The King’s Breakfast a few times through:-)

I’m going to aim to get myself properly organised for the whole of Block 6, including all the nursery rhymes and folksongs printed out for the TV cabinet, and the This Week blog entries pre-written. We’ll see how that goes…

Mullet!

I can’t believe I just cut Bilby’s hair into a mullet:-(  I was just trying to make the front a little less likely to cover her face (it continues curly, so it’s fine when dry, but in swimming lessons she really can’t see…) And I trimmed a bit off the back where she rests when sleeping, as that was getting thin, frizzy and tangling:-( I took a little off the top to let the curls return there.

Then I looked at the finished product and realised that I’ve given her a mullet:-( A very curly, cute one, but a mullet none-the-less…

Progress

Week 4, Block 5, Dorothea Term

We’ve gotten back into a bit of a rhythm again this week, so we’ve actually done some of the reading as well as singing:-)

Movie Night

We don’t do TV (well, with the kids, Paddington and I watch plenty🙁 )

When I was expecting Bilby I kept meaning to tape some Play School so that I could play it for Puggle when I needed a break. I didn’t ever get around to this. In the last week though, I have let them watch Play School a couple of times (on those days when we weren’t going out, and Puggle had completed his morning jobs—including Mat Time) because the time it’s on is really convenient:-) (If you haven’t ever looked at the Play School site, you really should! It’s got crafts and activities and a list of all the songs:-) )

In recent months, they’ve occasionally seen some Baby Einstein/Winnie-the-Pooh at one set of grandparents, and nature documentaries (everything Panda or Elephant related:-) at the other). We’ve also watched a couple of family movies at Must See Movies (must update the site:-( ).

We’d always planned to introduce some TV, but obviously it’s a bit of a balancing game. Puggle was essentially four before he’d seen anything other than occasional incidentals. Bilby is obviously not quite two—so much younger.

I’ve read a number of people over the years talk about Movie Night with their families, where they watch not only movies, but documentaries. It seemed like a good idea to me as they’re generally shorter than most movies:-) So this evening (given both children went down for Quiet Time significantly later than usual), we popped some popcorn, cuddled up on the couch and watched the first episode of Walking With Dinosaurs.

I’d say it was a success:-) We had dinosaurs crawling their way to bed, making appropriate noises and all:-) It was Bilby who initiated it:-)

I don’t think we’ll do it regularly at this stage, but it is something we’ll plan on repeating when ‘the stars align’:-)

Learning for Life Expo

The Home Based Learning Network (the local Home Education group) is holding a Trade Fair this coming Saturday.

Obviously, it’s being put on for home schoolers, but everyone is welcome… There’s a long list of vendors who will be there, so if you’re looking for resources to use with your kids at home you might well find it here.

Book Meme

1) Look at the list and bold those you have read.
2) Italicize those you intend to read.
3) Underline the books you LOVE.
4) Reprint this list in your own blog.

1. Pride and Prejudice – Jane Austen
2. The Lord of the Rings – JRR Tolkien (I have read most of the first, and I will get through the rest one day!)
3. Jane Eyre – Charlotte Bronte
4. Harry Potter series – JK Rowling
5. To Kill a Mockingbird – Harper Lee
6. The Bible
7. Wuthering Heights – Emily Bronte
8. Nineteen Eighty Four – George Orwell
9. His Dark Materials – Philip Pullman
10. Great Expectations – Charles Dickens
11. Little Women – Louisa M Alcott (Loved this:-) The whole series:-) )
12. Tess of the D’Urbervilles – Thomas Hardy (Enjoyed this far more than The Mayor of Casterbridge—but that wouldn’t be at all hard!)
13. Catch 22 – Joseph Heller
14. Complete Works of Shakespeare (I’ve read an awful lot of them, but I know there are more I need to get to. Some I love, others I like, and others didn’t really appeal to me.)
15. Rebecca – Daphne Du Maurier
16. The Hobbit – JRR Tolkien (I chose it for bookclub, and I still haven’t finished it yet:-( )
17. Birdsong – Sebastian Faulks
18. Catcher in the Rye – JD Salinger
19. The Time Traveler’s Wife – Audrey Niffenegger
20. Middlemarch – George Eliot (I was given this for Christmas years ago, and I haven’t gotten to it yet.)
21. Gone With The Wind – Margaret Mitchell
22. The Great Gatsby – F. Scott Fitzgerald (I can’t actually remember any details, but I do know I read it.)
23. Bleak House – Charles Dickens
24. War and Peace – Leo Tolstoy
25. The Hitch Hiker’s Guide to the Galaxy – Douglas Adams
26. Brideshead Revisited – Evelyn Waugh (I keep coming across references to this, so it’s getting to the time I’ll get around to it.)
27. Crime and Punishment – Fyodor Dostoyevsky
28. Grapes of Wrath – John Steinbeck
29. Alice in Wonderland – Lewis Carroll
30. The Wind in the Willows – Kenneth Grahame
31. Anna Karenina – Leo Tolstoy
32. David Copperfield – Charles Dickens
33. Chronicles of Narnia – CS Lewis
34. Emma – Jane Austen
35. Persuasion – Jane Austen
36. The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe – CS Lewis
37. The Kite Runner – Khaled Hosseini
38. Captain Corelli’s Mandolin – Louis De Bernieres
39. Memoirs of a Geisha – Arthur Golden (Bookclub)
40. Winnie the Pooh – AA Milne
41. Animal Farm – George Orwell
42. The Da Vinci Code – Dan Brown (Bookclub)
43. One Hundred Years of Solitude – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
44. A Prayer for Owen Meaney – John Irving
45. The Woman in White – Wilkie Collins
46. Anne of Green Gables – LM Montgomery (I’m a big Anne fan:-) )
47. Far From The Madding Crowd – Thomas Hardy
48. The Handmaid’s Tale – Margaret Atwood (I had already read it, and then we read it for Bookclub.)
49. Lord of the Flies – William Golding (Read it in about year 10 and hated it with a passion.)
50. Atonement – Ian McEwan
51. Life of Pi – Yann Martel (We got it for Christmas a couple of years ago, but we’ve lent it to my father-in-law.)
52. Dune – Frank Herbert
53. Cold Comfort Farm – Stella Gibbons
54. Sense and Sensibility – Jane Austen
55. A Suitable Boy – Vikram Seth
56. The Shadow of the Wind – Carlos Ruiz Zafon
57. A Tale Of Two Cities – Charles Dickens
58. Brave New World – Aldous Huxley
59. The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time – Mark Haddon
60. Love In The Time Of Cholera – Gabriel Garcia Marquez
61. Of Mice and Men – John Steinbeck (Bookclub. I hated it. The following year I taught a year 11 english class, and someone else had already set the booklist so I had to teach it. By the time I finished doing so, I was far more appreciative!)
62. Lolita – Vladimir Nabokov
63. The Secret History – Donna Tartt
64. The Lovely Bones – Alice Sebold
65. Count of Monte Cristo – Alexandre Dumas (Hmm… I’m pretty sure I have, although, once again, I can’t recall any details.)
66. On The Road – Jack Kerouac
67. Jude the Obscure – Thomas Hardy
68. Bridget Jones’s Diary – Helen Fielding
69. Midnight’s Children – Salman Rushdie
70. Moby Dick – Herman Melville
71. Oliver Twist – Charles Dickens
72. Dracula – Bram Stoker
73. The Secret Garden – Frances Hodgson Burnett
74. Notes From A Small Island – Bill Bryson
75. Ulysses – James Joyce
76. The Bell Jar – Sylvia Plath
77. Swallows and Amazons – Arthur Ransome
78. Germinal – Emile Zola
79. Vanity Fair – William Makepeace Thackeray
80. Possession – AS Byatt
81. A Christmas Carol – Charles Dickens
82. Cloud Atlas – David Mitchell
83. The Color Purple – Alice Walker
84. The Remains of the Day – Kazuo Ishiguro
85. Madame Bovary – Gustave Flaubert
86. A Fine Balance – Rohinton Mistry
87. Charlotte’s Web – EB White
88. The Five People You Meet In Heaven – Mitch Albom
89. Adventures of Sherlock Holmes – Sir Arthur Conan Doyle (Really enjoyed most of them.)
90. The Faraway Tree Collection – Enid Blyton (Haven’t read them in years, but I do have very fond memories.)
91. Heart of Darkness – Joseph Conrad
92. The Little Prince – Antoine De Saint-Exupery (In French and English.)
93. The Wasp Factory – Iain Banks
94. Watership Down – Richard Adams
95. A Confederacy of Dunces – John Kennedy Toole
96. A Town Like Alice – Nevil Shute
97. The Three Musketeers – Alexandre Dumas
98. Hamlet – William Shakespeare
99. Charlie and the Chocolate Factory – Roald Dahl
100. Les Miserables – Victor Hugo

That ‘Unique’ Meme

I’ve seen this a few places, and have finally come up with three things:-)
Post 3 things you’ve done in your lifetime that you don’t think anybody else on your friends list has done:

1. Built and driven a solar car from Darwin to Adelaide for the 2001 World Solar Challenge (a couple on my friends list also built it and were on the trip, but I was one of a limited number of drivers:-) )

2. Taught woodwork/metalwork/tech drawing/photography/jewellery… (and a few other bits as well… but I think there are people on my flist who teach/taught all of those.)

3. Directed a Gang Show 5 times (actually, all the Gang Show stuff… participated for 20 years, stage managed 7 times… Sadly it seems to have disappeared in the last couple of years.)

Save the Children Book Sale

I know that lots of people are likely to be interested:-)

The Save the Children Fund Book Sale is coming up from the 24th to the 29th of August.

“Little Cherry Nose”

Puggle has taken to kissing me on the nose, and then commenting in a sing-song voice “Little Cherry Nose”… The other day I finally thought to ask him where he had got it from (I didn’t recognise it, and he’s still at the stage where I’m pretty familiar with all his inputs—usually it’s a book, or one of the folksongs).

He told me he got it “out of my heart”.

How could I not melt?

Carnivals

CM carnival logoCarnival of Homeschooling

Twinkling Stars Family School is hosting the current Charlotte Mason Carnival.

Dewey’s Treehouse is hosting the current Homeschooling Carnival, the Homesick Campers edition (number 130!)

This Week

Our plans for
Week 4, Block 5, Dorothea Term

Language
Introduce phonograms ‘oi’, ‘oy’ (sandpaper letters and sand tray)
Iac et Iill (Jack and Jill)
Iam iam! (Right now!)
Berceuse de Brahms (Brahms’ Lullaby)
Excuse_moi (Excuse me)

English Studies
The Boy with the Golden Stars‘ from The Violet Fairy Book Andrew Lang
Everything in its Right Place‘ from The Complete Illustrated Stories Hans Christian Anderson
Narration: ‘The Vain Jackdaw and his Borrowed Feathers‘, ‘The Monkey and the Dolphin‘, ‘The Wolf and the Ass‘ from The Aesop for Children Ill. Milo Winter (He’s really a bit too young for Narration, so I’m mostly going to be keeping an ear out for re-tellings, or incorporation in play)
Recitation: The King’s Breakfast A. A. Milne from When We Were Very Young

Art and Music
Folksong: The Battle Hymn of the Republic
Composer: George Frederic Handel
Work: Music For the Royal Fireworks
Artist: Rembrandt van Rijn
Work: Aristotle Contemplating a Bust of Homer
Music: Beat (The KodĂĄly Method 1 Lois Choksy) See Saw, Margary Daw
Art: Crayons, Textured papers
More Resist Effects (Art Ideas Fiona Watts)

Progress

Week 3, Block 5, Dorothea Term

Iac et Iill is working well, and Puggle seems to enjoy Berceuse de Brahms (although, he doesn’t usually join in). We’re still pretty much about the singing much more than any of the reading, in fact I’ve barely even done the poems this week:-(

Balloon Day

Puggle has declared today ‘Balloon Day’. He found a bag with a couple of (unblown) balloons in it, and has insisted on blowing them up and playing with them. He did this before I was awake (Paddington wakes first on Saturdays), and greeted me with the fact of the day:-)

He’s rather taken with the notion:-)

Carnival

CM carnival logoCarnival of Homeschooling Education is an atmosphere, a discipline, a life is hosting the current Charlotte Mason Carnival. Walking Therein is hosting the current Homeschooling Carnival, End of the School Year! Or is it?

This Week

Our plans for
Week 3, Block 5, Dorothea Term

Language
Introduce phonograms ‘ay’, ‘ai’ (sandpaper letters and sand tray)
Iac et Iill (Jack and Jill)
Iam iam! (Right now!)
Berceuse de Brahms (Brahms’ Lullaby)
Excuse_moi (Excuse me)

English Studies
The Monkey and the Jellyfish‘ from The Violet Fairy Book Andrew Lang
The Elf-Hill‘ from The Complete Illustrated Stories Hans Christian Anderson
Narration: ‘The Fox and the Lion‘, ‘The Lion and the Ass‘, ‘The Dog and his Master’s Dinner‘ from The Aesop for Children Ill. Milo Winter (He’s really a bit too young for Narration, so I’m mostly going to be keeping an ear out for re-tellings, or incorporation in play)
Recitation: Missing and Hoppity A. A. Milne from When We Were Very Young

Art and Music
Folksong: The Battle Hymn of the Republic
Composer: George Frederic Handel
Work: Water Music
Artist: Rembrandt van Rijn
Work: Aristotle Contemplating a Bust of Homer
Music: Beat (The KodĂĄly Method 1 Lois Choksy) Ring A Ring A Rosy
Art: Crayons
Textured Paper (Art Ideas Fiona Watts)

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