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The Genial Hearth
I’ve just put the kettle on, join me for a cuppa and a chat.

Archive for July, 2009

So It Begins!

Cygnet has joined in the chasey around the house!

Up until now he hadn’t really had the stamina, and the others would lap him before he realised there was a circuit… but tonight? He kept on going:-) (Still being lapped, but not letting himself be distracted from his purpose:-) )

Food Post Friday

Friday: Apple and Apricot Risotto… I’m going to add the leftover roast pork, and sprinkle with some chopped pistachios to add the salt/crunch that we’ll miss with no crackling.
Saturday: Butter Chicken, Pilau, Muttachar. We’ll get breads from Prime Foods, maybe a chutney, and see what dessert looks like (unless I get enthused and try making Kulfi).
Sunday: Roast Lamb and Roast Vegies (I’m going to do a Jam Roll for afternoon tea).
Monday: Avocado Pasta (I’ll see if Puggle is interested in doing this, seeing as it’s familiar… That’d be the first time he repeats a dinner).
Tuesday: Shepherd’s Pie (Puggle will make this).
Wednesday: Dinner with Grandma and Grandad.
Thursday: Minestrone and Bread.

Puggle’s Cooking

Puggle has been doing a fair amount of cooking in the last couple of months—I was going to post them individually, but I’m not getting it done, so a summary it is!

Mother’s Day Cake.

Cupcakes.

He started making regular(ish) dinners with Aunty B’s Antipasto Pesto (8th June).

Next was Scrambled Eggs—which he doesn’t actually like:-) (9th June, this is when he started being aloud to light the gas stove.)

Pea and Ham Soup (18th June).

Curried Sausages (23rd June).

Chicken Spaghetti (14th July).

Corn and Bacon Chowder (15th July).

He taught Bilby how to make Fairy Bread (wholemeal bread, naturally coloured hundreds and thousands:-) ).

And tonight, he’s making Red Beans and Rice:-)

He has yet to cut onions (I do that), because the smell is too overwhelming for him… we’ll work on that in the next couple of weeks.

He’s doing really well in the kitchen, and although time is definitely a consideration (it takes him a long time to cook), as long as I am sure to plan it early enough in our day, I am relaxed enough to let him do it:-) (Actually this is one area where I credit Workboxes with the success—they mean that I have not only thought about what is for dinner, but whether it’s something he could cook. If it is, and the day is not to busy to allow it, I put it in his boxes… he loves to work in the kitchen, so it’s a ‘fun’ thing for him:-) ) He’s also working on making a recipe book.

(I think we’re on track that he could take over all the cooking when he’s twelve… it’s not my plan that he will, just that if it were necessary, he could:-) I heard an interview with Kylie Kwong a couple of years ago, where she said her mum went to China for six weeks when she was twelve, and she was left in charge of all the cooking—I thought that seemed like a good point at which to aim:-) )

This Week

Our plans for
Week 4, Block 6, Dorothea Term

Puggle
Chapter 20 ‘The Face’ from Song School Latin by Amy Rehn
‘The Guardian Geese’ from The Orchard Book of Roman Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean
”The Ass in the Lion’s Skin’, ‘The Bees and Wasps, and the Hornet, ‘The Lark and her Young Ones’ from Aesop’s Fables for Children Illustrated by Milo Winter
The Muddle-headed Wombat by Ruth Park
‘The Three Musicians’ from Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
‘Limericks’ The Complete Verse and Other Nonsense by Edward Lear
Copywork: ‘ay’, ‘ai’
RightStart B

Bilby
‘Out West’ from European Word Book by Richard Scarry
‘The Grand Old Duke of York’, ‘Mrs Mason Bought a Basin’ from My Very First Mother Goose Iona Opie
‘North West Passage’ from A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert L. Stevenson
‘The Story of Sigurd’ from The Red Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
The Tale of Pigling Bland by Beatrix Potter (I’ve borrowed a number of these on CD, and have found that’s helped a lot with reading them this time around!)
Hieronyme de Carmot et ses droles d’animaux/Hieronymus Betts and His Unusual Pets by M. P. Robertson

Everyone
Minimus araneus compluvium ascendit
Lente! (Slowly!)
J’ai des rubans sur mes souliers
Arrete! (Stop!)
Folksong: The Fair Janet
Composer: Franz Liszt
Work: Mephisto Waltz
Artist: Caspar David Friedrich
Work: Woman at a Window
Music: Accent (p. 25 The Kodaly Method I)
Rise Sally Rize
Art: Wax Crayons
Sheep on a Hill (p. 172 The Usborne Complete Book of Art Ideas)
‘Mouth’, ‘Ocean’, ‘Ocean Ridge’ from Geography from A to Z: A Picture Glossary by Jack Knowlton
‘Babylon Takes Over Again’, ‘Life in Early Crete’ from The Story of the World: Ancient Times by Susan Wise Bauer
Recorder ‘Hot Cross Ending’ from Black Belt Recorder 1

Friday Food Post

Friday: Fish and Chips.
Saturday: Potluck for Movie club. I’ll probably take nachos (but I’ll try making my own topping again).
Sunday: Roast Pork and roast vegies.
Monday: Dinner with Granny and Grandpa.
Tuesday: Red Beans and Rice with Green Beans.
Wednesday: Dinner with Grandma and Grandad.
Thursday: French Onion Soup with Croutons.

This Week

Our plans for
Week 3, Block 6, Dorothea Term

Puggle
Chapter 19 ‘The Body’ from Song School Latin by Amy Rehn
‘Kissed By the Moon’, ‘The Man who Chopped down Trees’ from The Orchard Book of Roman Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean
‘The Wolf, The Kid and the Goat’, ‘The Swallow and the Crow’, ‘The Cock and the Fox’ from Aesop’s Fables for Children Illustrated by Milo Winter
The Muddle-headed Wombat by Ruth Park
‘The Story of a Clever Tailor’ from Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
‘Limericks’ The Complete Verse and Other Nonsense by Edward Lear
Copywork: ‘ar’, ‘ch’
RightStart B

Bilby
‘Cars and Lorries’ from European Word Book by Richard Scarry
‘Whose little pigs are these, these, these?’, ‘Chook, chook, chook, chook’ from My Very First Mother Goose Iona Opie
‘Winter-Time’, ‘The Hayloft’ from A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert L. Stevenson
‘The Marvellous Musician’ from The Red Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
The Tale of Timmy Tiptoes by Beatrix Potter (I’ve borrowed a number of these on CD, and have found that’s helped a lot with reading them this time around!)
Hieronyme de Carmot et ses droles d’animaux/Hieronymus Betts and His Unusual Pets by M. P. Robertson

Everyone
Minimus araneus compluvium ascendit
Lente! (Slowly!)
J’ai des rubans sur mes souliers
Arrete! (Stop!)
Folksong: The Fair Janet
Composer: Franz Liszt
Work: Piano Sonata in B Minor
Artist: Caspar David Friedrich
Work: Woman at a Window
Music: Accent (p. 25 The Kodaly Method I)
Looby Loo
Art: Oil Pastels
Lizards (p. 124 The Usborne Complete Book of Art Ideas)
‘Mountain’, ‘Mountain Pass’, ‘Mountain Range’ from Geography from A to Z: A Picture Glossary by Jack Knowlton
‘The Phoenicians’, ‘The Return of the Assyrians’ from The Story of the World: Ancient Times by Susan Wise Bauer
Recorder ‘Hot Cross Ending’ from Black Belt Recorder 1

Friday Food Post

Friday: Gnocchi with Oven Roasted Tomato and Capsicum Sauce, Cinnamon Toffee Apple Wedges
Saturday: Roast Beef with Roast Vegetables
Sunday: Chickpea Tagine with Figs
Monday: Dinner with Granny and Grandpa
Tuesday: Toad in the Hole with Tomato and Rosemary, Green Beans and Lentil Salad (Vanilla Slice for supper)
Wednesday: Dinner with Grandma and Grandad
Thursday: Moroccan Beef Soup with Jewelled Couscous

(Somewhat) Virtual Quilting Bee

I’ve been all inspired recently (for a range of reasons… so many pretty things!) about patchwork and quilting! So now, I’d like to try a (Somewhat!) Virtual Quilting Bee (I’ve been watching this one for a while). (Melissa talked about some of the others here.)

Basically, each person signs up and is assigned a month. They send some material to each other participant in time for their month. If you like, you can nominate a theme (I’ve seen Nature, specific colours, specific patterns). Everyone uses your fabric, and supplements however they choose, to complete a block (other fabrics from their stash, embroidery, appliqué etc). Then they send this back to you after your month. This means you get to sew with others, without having to actually get organised to be in the same location:-)

Essentially you will complete a block a month, and end up with (hopefully! depending on numbers!) a quilt’s worth of blocks. It’s then up to you how you use your blocks, whether you make them up as a quilt, as cushions, as a pair of laprugs, turn them into a bag—or leave them to sit in your to-do pile:-)

You do not need to have done any piecing or quilting before (it’s probably a good idea to have done some sewing before…. but if you’re keen, the lack probably wouldn’t stop you! In fact, this may be an ‘approachable’ way to give it a go:-) ) You may choose to hand sew or machine sew (I’ll probably do most of mine by hand… because that’s more convenient for me, but there’s at least one that I’ll be considering that I’ll do by machine).

I’d like to ask that all blocks are put online (probably not until after the recipient has received them though!), and it would be nice if you put up pictures of your finished object(s). This could either be on a blog, or on flickr or something else like that. However, don’t let the lack of your own space be a hindrance to this… I’m happy to post photos for anyone who can’t!

So, specifications are as follows.

2 or 3 pieces of fabric, about 10 cms (1/8 yard) of each (or half a fat quarter). (Please stick to cottons to assist with washing).
Block size 32 cms x 32 cms (finished size 30 x 30). (That’s near enough to 12.5 in square, with 12 in. square for the finished size.) If you would like a different size, just ask for it (you may need to send more material if you want something dramatically larger!)
Notes? (Theme, any specific requirements or things to avoid—for example, if you’re intending to use it with a baby, you might request no 3d items, like buttons or beads).

Let me know if you’re interested, and we’ll sort out months—I figure we’ll use August to sort it out, and get going in September. I was going to suggest Craft Sunday as the handover, but seeing as I’m putting it out on the blog, there might be some non-locals involved, so posting may be the way to go.
I’m really hoping to have about a dozen participants, but I guess we’ll wait and see! Feel free to pass this information on to anyone else who might be interested, all replies to the blogpost.

Some block tutorials, to give you ideas (I may have gone a little overboard!)…
Nine patch
Disappearing 9-patch
Crazy 9-patch
Pinwheels
Cartwheel
Shoo Fly
Variable Star
(actually, there’s a whole pile of directions here!)
Paintbox
Crazy
Hourglass
Gretchen
Amish Dahlia
Scrappy Hedgerow
A number of different blocks
Flying Geese
Teapot
Come Over to My House (a whole quilt’s worth of block patterns, only some will be accessible)
Vehicles

There’s a mass of beautiful quilts linked here.

There’s a tutorial on appliqué here.

(Oh Fransson has a number of quilt related tutorials, for once you have your finished blocks!)

So, who’s joining me?

Cygnet

As a reward for that flurry of back-dated planning posts an Up-to-the-minute Cygnet Update! He’s 10 and a bit months old, and has eight teeth (as of about two weeks ago).

He can clap! He’s been doing ‘high five’ claps, with me for a couple of weeks, but he started banging some blocks together, and next thing you know… he was clapping!

In the last week or so, his random hand movements have turned into definite waves (still as likely to be towards himself, as to someone else).

Also, today we were at my niece M’s birthday, and she pushed herself onto hands and feet. Someone asked if Cygnet could do that, and I very dismissively said no. However, he’s just done that, too!

All while being miserable with a cold:-(

This Week

Our plans for
Week 2, Block 6, Dorothea Term

Puggle
Chapter 15 ‘Pets’ from Song School Latin by Amy Rehn
‘Burning the Books’, ‘Little Old Boy’ from The Orchard Book of Roman Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean
‘The Mole and his Mother’, ‘The North Wind and the Sun’ from Aesop’s Fables for Children Illustrated by Milo Winter
The Muddle-headed Wombat by Ruth Park
‘The Riddle’ from Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
‘The Calico Pie’ The Complete Verse and Other Nonsense by Edward Lear
Copywork: Name, ‘ou’, ‘oo’
RightStart B

Bilby
‘Buildings’ from European Word Book by Richard Scarry
‘One, Two, Three, Four’, ‘One for Sorrow, Two for Joy’ from My Very First Mother Goose Iona Opie
‘Fairy Bread’, ‘Happy Thought’, ‘Time to Rise’, ‘From a Railway Carriage’ from A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert L. Stevenson
‘The Golden Goose’ from The Red Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
The Tale of Samuel Whiskers or The Roly-Poly Puddingby Beatrix Potter (I’ve borrowed a number of these on CD, and have found that’s helped a lot with reading them this time around!)
Hieronyme de Carmot et ses droles d’animaux/Hieronymus Betts and His Unusual Pets by M. P. Robertson

Everyone
Hic, Haec, Hoc
Cito! (Quickly!)
Alouette
Oui Maman (Yes Mama)
Folksong: The Fair Janet
Composer: Franz Liszt
Work: Piano Sonata in B Minor
Artist: Caspar David Friedrich
Work: Moon Rising Over the Sea
Music: Accent (p. 25 The Kodaly Method I)
A Tisket, A Tasket
Art: Oil Pastels
Trees/Squiggles (p. 116/147 The Usborne Complete Book of Art Ideas)
‘Meander’ from Geography from A to Z: A Picture Glossary by Jack Knowlton
‘The New Kingdom of Egypt’, ‘The Israelites Leave Egypt’ from The Story of the World: Ancient Times by Susan Wise Bauer
Recorder ‘Hot Cross Ending’ from Black Belt Recorder 1

Laying!

While we were away last weekend, my folks were keeping an eye on the chooks. We got a phone call on Saturday night to say that there was an egg! (Henny had stopped laying 2 days after we got them, so this was news.)

By the time we got home ourselves, there were another two! We’re thinking that Blackie (the Australorpe) has finally started laying, and we’ve had not quite an egg a day ever since:-) Puggle is still counting the numbers:-)

Food Post Friday

Friday: Nachos (and possibly icy poles), Popcorn to accompany our movie night:-)
Saturday: Tasty Fish Bake and Roasted Broccoli
Sunday: Roast Chicken with Roast Vegies (Potato, onions, sweet potatoes, peas), followed by some sort of berry/pastry parcels
Monday: With Granny and Grandpa
Tuesday: Chicken Spaghetti (doubling for the freezer)
Wednesday: Corn and Bacon Chowder
Thursday: With Grandma and Grandad

This Week

Our plans for
Week 1, Block 6, Dorothea Term

Puggle
Chapter 15 ‘Pets’ from Song School Latin by Amy Rehn
‘The Man Who Cut Down Trees’, ‘ Tell Tale Tit’ from The Orchard Book of Roman Myths by Geraldine McCaughrean
‘The Ant and the Dove’, ‘The Man and the Satyr’, ‘The Lion’s Share’ from Aesop’s Fables for Children Illustrated by Milo Winter
The Muddle-headed Wombat by Ruth Park
‘Spindle, Shuttle, and Needle’ from Green Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
‘The Calico Pie’ The Complete Verse and Other Nonsense by Edward Lear
RightStart B

Bilby
‘Work Machines’ from European Word Book by Richard Scarry
‘From Wibbleton to Wobbleton’, ‘Cobbler, Cobbler, Mend My Shoe’ from My Very First Mother Goose Iona Opie
‘The Swing’, ‘Looking-Glass River’ from A Child’s Garden of Verses by Robert L. Stevenson
‘Snowdrop’ from The Red Fairy Book by Andrew Lang
The Tale of Samuel Whiskers or The Roly-Poly Puddingby Beatrix Potter (I’ve borrowed a number of these on CD, and have found that’s helped a lot with reading them this time around!)
Au lit, petit monstre! by Mario Ramos

Everyone
Hic, Haec, Hoc
Cito! (Quickly!)
Alouette
Oui Maman (Yes Mama)
Folksong: The Fair Janet
Composer: Franz Liszt
Work: Liebestraum for piano
Artist: Caspar David Friedrich
Work: Moon Rising Over the Sea
Music: Accent (p. 25 The Kodaly Method I)
Stars Shining
Art: Wax Crayons
Reflections in Water (p. 104 The Usborne Complete Book of Art Ideas)
‘Marsh’ from Geography from A to Z: A Picture Glossary by Jack Knowlton
Recorder ‘Hot Cross Ending’ from Black Belt Recorder 1

Fair Janet

“Ye maun gang to your father, Janet
Ye maun gang to him sune;
Ye maun gang to your father Janet,
Before his days are dune.”

Janet’s awa’ to her father,
As fast as she could hie:
“Oh, what’s your will wi’ me father;
Oh, what’s your will wi’ me?”

“My will wi’ you, fair Janet,” he said,
“It is baith bed and board;
Some say that ye lo’e sweet Willie,
But ye maun wed a French lord.”

Janet’s awa’ to her chamber,
As fast as she could go;
Wha’s the first ane that tapped there
But sweet Willie, her jo?

“O we maun part this love, Willie
That has been lang between;
There’s a French lord coming o’er the sea
To wed me wi’ a ring.”

Willie he was scarce awa’
And the lady put to bed;
When in came in her father dear,
Make haste and busk the bride!

“There’s a sair pain in my head, father;
There’s a sair pain in my side;
And ill, O ill am I, father.
This day for to be a bride.”

Some put on the gay green robes,
And some put on the brown;
But Janet put on the scarlet robes,
To shine foremost through the town.

And some they mounted the black steed,
And some they mounted the brown,
But Janet mounted the milk white steed,
To ride foremost through the town.

“O wha will guide your horse, Janet?
O wha will guide him best?
O wha but Willie, my true love;
He kens I lo’e him best.”

And when they came to Marie’s Kirk,
To tye the haly ban’
Fair Janet’s face looked pale and wan’,
And her colour gaed and cam’

When dinner it was past and done,
And dancing to begin,
O, we’ll go take the bride’s maidens,
And we’ll go fill the ring.

O, ben them cam’ the auld French lord,
Saying, “Bride, will ye dance wi’ me?”
“Awa’, awa’, ye auld French lord,
Your face I dawna see.”

O, ben then cam’ now sweet Willie,
Saying, “Bride, will ye dance wi’ me?”
“Ay, by my sooth, and that I will,
Gin my back should break in three.”

She hadna turned her thro’ the dance,
Thro’ the dance but thrice,
When she fell down at Willie’s feet,
And up did never rise.

Willie’s ta’en the key o’ his coffer,
And gi’en it to his man,
“Gae hame, and tell my mother dear,
More horse he has me slain.”

The tane was buried in Marie’s Kirk,
And the tither in Marie’s quier;
And of the tane there grew a birk,
And the tither, a bonnie brier.