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The Genial Hearth
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Archive for April, 2010

Geography: France

First Monday: Location. (I’ve found a world map I’ll use, and just set him to find the country in the atlas, and identify it on the map)
First Tuesday: Flag.
First Wednesday: Language (I’m not sure what we’ll do here, because we’re already doing French every week).
First Thursday: Famous People (we’ll read from Claude Monet, A Picture Book of Louis Braille, Louis Braille.
First Friday: Music. (Folk songs/dancing and ‘culture’) Frére Jacques, Boules, Citron Presse, Croque Monsieur. The Marseillaise
Second Monday: Features. (Cities, Mountains, Rivers)
Second Tuesday: Animals.
Second Wednesday: Language (Once again, not sure what we’ll do here).
Second Thursday: Culture. (Currency, festivals, population, religion) More Boules:-)
Second Friday: Art/Craft. We’ll probably try painting in the style of one of the French schools.
Second Saturday: Food (will possibly be shifted around a bit as there’s a party in the way:-) ).

Books
I’ll update the books once we work out which ones have actually been useful.

Anzac Day

For a file folder swap, I’ve done up a collection of Anzac Day activities and information. I thought I might as well share my links here so that other people can make use of it:-)

Most of this is aimed at younger children. And it’s basically from an Australian perspective.

For starters, there’s a great (young kids) introduction. It covers the Anzac Connection, War, (with a detour to a re-telling of Simpson and his Donkey), the Defence Forces and Anzac Day.
(I need to include some information about books… still to come. In the meantime, there’s a useful looking post here!)

You might want to explore flags. Firstly, a bit about the Parts of a Flag, then Australian and New Zealand flags to colour, and a little about flag protocol.

Next, words and music are a fairly important feature of Anzac Day.

First up, the texts of ‘In Flanders Fields’, ‘Ode of Remembrance’ (where we get “They shall not grow old”) and ‘Recessional’ (source of “Lest we forget”… which is often sung to the tune of Eternal Father, Strong to Save). These may be useful for copywork or memorisation (or just so that they’re known for Anzac services).

There’s the lyrics to some of the songs I associate with Anzac Day. Two Little Boys, God Bless Australia, And the Band Played Waltzing Matilda, I Was Only Nineteen, and Mothers, Daughters, Wives.

Of course, the cornet/trumpet calls are a key feature. The most important is The Last Post (music here), (although, if you have smaller children who might want to learn to play things, Taps might be a easier choice! It is used locally, although not in the military.) We commonly refer to Reveille (as mentioned yesterday, be sure it’s the Commonwealth version, here it starts at 1:20! Music at the same link as above). But we usually hear Rouse, because it’s shorter (here it starts at 1:30, once again, music at the same link). This page which contains audio files of The Last Post, Reveille (Commonwealth version) and Rouse. (The same friend that pointed me at that also linked to this page, which has US bugle calls! How cool! There’s one for school! And meals! And mail! Not really Anzac Day… but interesting all the same—and I’d like to be able to find it again!)

There’s instructions on how to make a bugle, and how to play it. (And if you want to add some science, try this video explanation of how to make your brass instrument:-) )

I’ve made a playlist of all (or almost all) the music I included.

For the smaller kids, some activities that might be of interest include a dot-to-dot soldier, a numbered dot-to-dot soldier, a maze (helping Simpson and his donkey find their way to the medical tent), some poppies, a Digger’s Rising Sun (I enlarged it, to fill a page), a WW1 Digger and nurse, making (or colouring) a wreath, and instructions to make tissue paper flowers.
(You can also find some online activities.)

Finally, I included some activities for slightly older children. There’s some teacher’s notes for Memorial. There’s a range of activities here (they’re probably mostly for high school aged kids). Some that seemed appropriate for primary (maybe?) aged kids, include Investigating the Spirit of Anzac and Their Spirit, Our History. There’s also a list of suggested activities here, for a range of primary ages.

Reveille or Rousse

I’ve been assembling a collection of ANZAC Day resources, and discovered a number of things. I wanted to note here, that what we (in Commonwealth countries) know as Reveille is not the same as folks in the US… But then again, what we know as Reveille, might actually be Rouse. You can check it out by comparing what you’re listening to, to the music here!

Geography: Burma

First Monday: Location. (I’ve found a world map I’ll use, and just set him to find the country in the atlas, and identify it on the map)
First Tuesday: Flag.
First Wednesday: Language (YouTube).
First Thursday: Animals.
First Friday: Music. (Folk songs/dancing)
First Saturday: Food. The Burmese Food Fete is running today, so we’ll go along with Grandad.
Second Monday: Features. (Cities, Mountains, Rivers) (I’ll give him a list of surrounding countries to colour particular colours).
Second Tuesday: Famous People (from Welcome to Myanmar).
Second Wednesday: Language.
Second Thursday: Culture (from Welcome to Myanmar. (Currency, festivals, population, religion)
Second Friday: Art/Craft. (from Welcome to Myanmar)
Second Sunday: Thingyan. BAWA is holding a celebration, so we’ll attend.

Books
Welcome to Myanmar
Myanmar
Thailand and Myanmar

I Dreamt I Dwelt in Marble Halls

You’ll find an .mp3 here.

I dreamt that I dwelt in marble halls,
With vassals and serfs at my side,
And of all who assembled within those walls,
That I was the hope and the pride.
I had riches too great to count
Could boast of a high ancestral name;

But I also dreamt, which pleased me most,
That you lov’d me still the same
That you lov’d me, you lov’d me still the same,
That you lov’d me, you lov’d me still the same.

I dreamt that suitors sought my hand;
That knights upon bended knee,
And with vows no maiden heart could withstand
They pledg’d their faith to me;
And I dreamt that one of that noble host
Came forth my hand to claim.

But I also dreamt, which pleased me most,
That you lov’d me still the same
That you lov’d me, you lov’d me still the same,
That you lov’d me, you lov’d me still the same.